Student Life

Student Leadership and Clubs

Student leadership is a core value at MUS. Through the many extracurricular opportunties available to our young men, they learn how to organize events, communicate, work as a team, increase empathy, take responsibility, and pursue new interests. All clubs, leadership groups, and honor societies are student-led and student-run. Faculty advisors oversee their work and offer guidance.

See our brochure here.

Civic Service Organization

A student's responsibility to the community is a priority at MUS. A student at MUS is given much: an excellent education, strong support, a chance for growth, and an opportunity to realize his potential. We expect our boys to give something back to their school and to the community that nurtures and supports them.

Through the Civic Service Organization, MUS students are committed to participating in a variety of community service projects each school year. The two major categories of activities are fundraising for charitable purposes and service to various community organizations and agencies.

Projects have included: MIFA Handyman, Students vs Hunger for Memphis Food Bank, Activities at Lester Community Center, tutoring students from the Emmanuel Center, working with the Binghampton Development Corporation, sponsoring an annual canned food drive, arranging an annual blood drive, and a wide variety of other activities. 

During the 2008-09 school year, the executives of the CSO created the organization's honor society. Societas Caritatis, meaning Society of Charity, recognizes students who have demonstrated outstanding charitable leadership and service to the local community. The CSO established the requirements for membership. The CSO Executive Board selects those students who have met the requirements.

Through their involvement, the boys at MUS learn important lessons about people in need, about problem solving, about leadership, and about working together.

Honor Council

Honor and integrity characterize a school worthy of respect. From its earliest days, MUS has developed these virtues through the Honor System. An integral part of the life of the students, the Honor System aids the school in its mission of developing a boy's character and enriching his spiritual life. 

At the beginning of each year this Oath of Honor is recited by all:

We, the students and faculty at Memphis University School, hereby pledge our full support to the Honor System. I pledge to be honest myself, and in order that the spirit and integrity of the Honor System may endure, I pledge that I will make known to the Honor Council any case of dishonesty which I may observe at MUS.

The Honor System establishes mutual trust between students and faculty, assures that no one take unfair advantage of his fellows, affirms that one tells the truth or suffer the consequences if he doesn't, and guarantees respect for another's good name and the good name of the school. The Honor Code expresses the ideal of a gentleman's agreement, a bond of trust and faith in each other. 

The Honor Council, composed of two boys elected from each class and a president elected by the student body, is charged with the responsibility of seeing that the Honor Code is upheld and that any violation is dealt with fairly and justly. The Honor System is directed by the students because of their desire to be worthy of the respect of their fellow men.

Primarily, the Honor Council investigates charges against a student for lying, cheating, or stealing. Every person in the school is responsible for reporting to the Council any violations of the Code so that the Council may consider the case and determine what should be done in the best interests of the Honor System and the person involved. The Council can only recommend to the school administration that an action be taken, and the administration, which can also investigate any violation, has the final decision regarding the Council's recommendations. We believe that working within the Honor System provides the best training in developing and maintaining a student's sense of integrity.

Student Council

Since the re-establishment of Memphis University School, the Student Council has played an important part in the coordination and control of student affairs. The Student Council's purpose is to serve as liaison between the student body and the faculty, making recommendations to school administration about changes in the school program that will work to the best interests of all concerned.

From time to time, the Student Council is consulted on matters that directly affect the student body. Wherever possible, the authority for regulating student affairs is given to the Student Council.

The Student Council president is elected by the student body, with a council composed of elected representatives from each class. The council has constitutional charge over such things as student activities and school elections. In becoming a member of the school, a student automatically becomes a participant in student government. It is expected that as a good citizen, a student will take an active part in the life of the school.

Student Clubs

Clubs offer an outlet for activities and interests that do not fall within existing programs. Clubs which have been established in the past include Billiards, Ultimate Frisbee, Philosophy, Chess, and Pep Club, for example. Student Council grants charters to any student groups that can demonstrate sufficient interest in the formation of a club, that can articulate a reasonable purpose for existence, and that can secure a faculty advisor who will participate in club activities.

Student-Led Publications

Student-led publications have always been an important extracurricular activity at MUS. In recent years all publications have set high standards and have involved many students in their creative efforts. 

We offer students the chance to contribute to four major publications:

The MUSe, an annual literary magazine
The Owl, the school yearbook
The Owl's Hoot, the school newspaper